Recently I read the headline that the CEO of Sony Pictures thinks UltraViolet needs improvement. The headline made me chuckle because I could have told them that two years ago. In fact I pointed it out in reviews back then. These days I do not even bother to check for UltraViolet, because to this date still, it is completely useless. What made me chuckle is also the fact, that Sony CEO Michael Lyndon made the comments for all the wrong reasons. The fact that “it’s not easy enough to use” is not the reason UltraViolet fails and despite what he says, This is not the “early days.” Those were two years ago. Technology is moving fast, as we all know, and two years are a lifetime in the digital domain. During this time period, UltraViolet could have – and should have – matured into a solid platform. It didn’t, because unless it goes through a complete paradigm shift, it simply can’t.

The real problem with UltraViolet, from my point of view, is not so much its technical implementation but the actual presumptions the underlying paradigm makes. UltraViolet is a streaming video format for mobile platforms, and as such it has very limited value and even less applications.

Even though we live in a world where everyone is connected and always-on, watching a streaming movie requires a bit more than an Internet connection. It requires a broadband connection that is always-on, and that’s where the problems start.

My iPad, for example is Wifi enabled but has no 3G, which means that as soon as I leave the house, I’m disconnected, and without Internet connection, there’s no UltraViolet. Silly, I know. I really don’t watch movies on a tablet at home. That would be just weird. I have TVs around the house that have been installed for that very purpose, and I evidently bought a DVD or Blu-Ray Disc, because that’s where I got my UltraViolet copy from, so why would I want to view a movie in an inferior format riddled with compression artifacts and in low resolution when I could instead watch it in 1080p on a large TV screen?

So, the moment I *would* be interested in watching a movie on my tablet is the very moment that UltraViolet disconnects and becomes unavailable. Epic fail! The logic that this would make sense or would even remotely be attractive for consumers boggles the mind and it stuns me that Hollywood executives are evidently still not seeing the real problem with UltraViolet.

But let’s say, for argument’s sake, that I wanted to watch an UltraViolet movie on my iPhone. Not sure why anyone would want to watch a movie on such a tiny screen, but fair enough, let’s just say…

The problem I have now is that for some time already phone carriers have begun charging for bandwidth for the most part. The glory days when the iPhone was first introduced and you could get unlimited Internet and Data on your phone for 30 dollars a month are long gone. As a result I am very reluctant to stream a 1 gigabyte movie to my phone, exhausting my monthly data plan allotment in the process. But even you have unlimited data and don’t mind to pay through the nose for it, you still have to content that many carriers are throttling the bandwidth on many of these data plans. The result is degrading the quality of your video even further as it streams. Not to mention that connectivity or download speed are far from being guaranteed. Every AT&T user can tell you that. So once again, UltraViolet’s proposition and appeal falls flat in its face.

But let’s put all that aside for a moment, and let’s just assume I am still not deterred and really, really want to watch an UltraViolet movie on my iPhone. The problem now is that with all the crowd noise around me, it is impossible to actually hear the movie. (How I wish the guy yelling into his cell phone so you can hear it all across the airport would just shut up… yeah, you know the type.) Sure, I could use headphones or earbuds, but sadly I refuse to turn myself into a Borg just yet, and do not enjoy wearing an earpiece, or maybe, I simply forgot them before I left the house. Since UltraViolet does not offer subtitles either, I am once again flat out of luck, and once again UltraViolet has no value to offer.

Ah, my stop just came up, twenty minutes into the movie, and I am asking myself why I even bothered trying to watch a movie on the go. I don’t know about you, but I rarely have two hours – the equivalent of the length of a typical Hollywood movie – available to me while I am on the go.

So, with all that in mind, is the failure of UltraViolet to connect, really surprising? It is clear to me that UltraViolet is simply a bad idea that has no practical real-world application as long as it does not offer digital download capabilities in addition to its streaming services, and adds basic accessibility factors such as subtitles to the mix. It was created in a bubble and sold to Hollywood studios as a technological illusion at a time when the studios had licked digital blood and were zealously looking for ever-growing opportunities to resell their catalogs. Well, it’s a pipe dream and it’s not going to go anywhere anytime soon.